Did you know? Undiagnosed diabetes may lead to a ‘silent’ heart attack

Did you know? Undiagnosed diabetes may l...

 

Diabetes plagues a majority of Indians, many of whom are at risk of getting heart attacks, without even knowing it.

 

“If you break a bone, you have pain. If you have malaria, you’ll have a fever, but one in two people living with diabetes don’t even know it,” remarks Dr Sai Satish, a cardiologist from Apollo Hospital on Greams Road in Chennai. Among other health risks, the doctor notes that undetected diabetes is one of the leading causes of coronary artery disease (CAD) in India and has been known to cause a ‘silent heart attack,’ in many. What is a ‘silent’ heart attack and how can it be precipitated by diabetes?

A ‘silent’ heart attack occurs when an individual has suffered a heart attack which they may not even be aware of. In some cases, this may be fatal and the diagnosis made only after the death of the individual. However, in the increasingly common clinical picture, more diabetics are going to the doctor only to find out that they have had a heart attack, but were not necessarily aware of it.

“Studies show that Indians who develop CAD are generally affected with an extremely aggressive form of heart disease. We have the evidence to show that this has been precipitated by the skyrocketing incidents of diabetes,” states Dr Sai.


CAD, or coronary artery disease, is a disease that affects the coronary arteries, which are the blood vessels that provide blood supply to the heart. In CAD, these vessels become blocked or narrowed which causes blood circulation to the heart to be cut off. Complete cessation of blood supply to the heart results in a myocardial infarction, or a heart attack. The most common symptoms of a heart attack are right-sided chest pain, pain radiating to the opposite arm, nausea, acidity, and excessive sweating.

In a silent heart attack, these symptoms are absent or are so mild that the individual doesn’t notice them. It may be fatal or may aggravate an individual’s existing CAD and pose a threat to them at a later time.

A recent study, which was presented in Paris called the PURE study, analysed data from five countries (including India) around the world. This study proved that cardiovascular disease (heart disease) is a growing concern, with most cases of CAD occurring in individuals with diabetes.

“We’ve seen a new transition, the old transition was infectious diseases giving way to noncommunicable diseases. Now we’re seeing a transition within noncommunicable diseases,” stated Dr Salim Yusef, one of the principal investigators of the study at a press conference.

How does diabetes play a role in the development of heart disease?

High blood sugar in a diabetic individual can lead to stiffening of blood vessels as a result of damage induced by glucose. Fat and cholesterol deposits then begin to build up in the vessel wall and result in a compromised integrity of the vessel structure. This can also lead to a condition called atherosclerosis where the blood vessel becomes completely blocked by the fat deposits.

If this specifically occurs in the coronary vessels, it will cut off the blood supply to the heart and cause a heart attack.

Individuals with hypertension are also at a higher risk of developing a silent heart attack.

What you should know about prevention

“The less you eat, the more you walk, laugh, and sleep, the longer you’ll live,” says Dr Sai with regards to prevention and self care.

In addition, he recommends that individuals who have been identified to be at risk should also have their blood sugar levels and blood pressure monitored routinely and kept under control. Reducing the amount of alcohol intake and cutting down on cigarettes has also been cited as helping reduce an individual’s risk of developing a silent heart attack.


PostedOn: 28 Oct 2019 Total Views: 104




How safe are artificial sweeteners?

How safe are artificial sweeteners?

Not all among the available artificial sweeteners in the market are safe for regular consumption.Sucralose is made from sugar and is made from a chemical process where the chlorine atoms replace the Hydrogen-oxygen atoms.There are several alternatives to sugar available to those watching their weigh...

31 Oct 2019

Respiratory distress management in paedi...

Respiratory distress management in paediatric care

Here is how you can take care of respiratory distress. Respiratory system in the human body starts from the nose, pharynx [throat], windpipe opening [glottis], wind pipe [trachea, bronchus] and its branches [bronchioles] to the lungs full of alveoli, which are grape-shaped. A disease of any part of ...

29 Oct 2019

Exercise can help in improving blood ves...

Exercise can help in improving blood vessels in he...

The finding is based on a study looking at swines, which have very similar blood vessels and heart muscles as humans. Washington: A new study has found that exercise results in improved health of blood vessels in heart, even for those who had experienced heart failure. The research from the Universi...

28 Oct 2019

Obesity has greater risk of death from n...

Obesity has greater risk of death from non-communi...

Obesity aggravates major leading causes of death, but risks are different for men, women.. The impacts of obesity, however, manifest differently in men and women. New Delhi: A new study reveals that people suffering from obesity have a greater risk of death from non-communicable diseases, but the ri...

28 Oct 2019

Keep children under five away from plant...

Keep children under five away from plant-based mil...

While milk is surely advised as a healthy and nutritive drink for children, those under the age of five are advocated to keep off from plant-based milk. According to Healthy Eating Research guidelines, plant-based milk made from rice, coconut, oats or other blends -- with the exception of fortified ...

24 Sep 2019

In a first, grandmothers walk the ramp i...

In a first, grandmothers walk the ramp in Bengalur...

Mrs India Grandmother - a beauty pageant for grandmothers was held in the city for the age group of above 45 years to 70 years. This platform gave an opportunity to grandmothers to unveil their talent and express themselves to the world. The event was organised and conceptualised by Sai Entertainmen...

20 Sep 2019

Tiny bubbles in our body to fight cancer...

Tiny bubbles in our body to fight cancer better th...

Researchers have found that tiny bubbles in our body might potentially be used to treat cancer and could fight the disease better than chemotherapy. Healthy cells in our body release nano-sized bubbles that transfer genetic material such as DNA and RNA to other cells. It’s your DNA that stores...

15 Sep 2019